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Eucalypts for your home garden

There are many eucalypts that are ideal for your home garden with beautiful flowers, foliage, fruit and bark. This collection of 'Eucalypts for your home garden' will show you the top 40 eucalypt species to grow in your home garden, where to plant them and how to care for them as they grow.

Use the hashtag #eucalyptsforyourhome to share images of your own wonderful planted eucalypts!


Best Viewed

  • Winter, Spring, Summer, Autumn

Key Plants

Angophora hispida (Dwarf Apple) - This species from the Hawkesbury region of New South Wales may grow into a multi-trunked mallee, or as a single trunked small tree. It will grow from 4 to 6 metres tall with attractive flaky bark. The new growth of the shoots is attractive, deep purplish red and densely hairy. In January it has clusters of large creamy white flowers forming in masses across the ends of the branches.
It will grow well in most soil types, prefers full sun or light shade, and is drought tolerant once established.

Corymbia ficifolia (Red Flowering Gum) - This variable small tree from south-west Western Australia is well known for its prolific displays of bright orange or red flowers at the ends of the branches in late summer and autumn. Often seen as a street tree, there are now many different varieties and hybrids being grown. Usually these are grafted onto seedling root stock thus providing reliable flower colour selection and known height with varieties ranging from 2 to 10 metres tall. Birds love the nectar rich flowers and the leaves may be used for fabric dyeing.
It will grow well in most soil types, prefers full sun or light shade, and is drought tolerant once established.

Eucalyptus caesia - This species grows in scattered locations near granite outcrops inland from Perth in Western Australia and is classified as 'rare' in the state. There are two distinct growth forms which have been previously described and sold as E. caesia subsp. caesia, which is a small tree, growing from 6 to 9 metres tall, and the other is E. caesia subsp. magna (also sold in nurseries as 'Silver Princess'), which may grow up to 12 metres tall, with narrow wispy stems and long weeping side branches. In both forms, the large rich pink or reddish flowers occur in drooping bunches in autumn and winter. The new shoots and leaves start reddish in colour then, like the flower buds and fruit, develop a grey waxy coating which adds a ghostly appearance to this very attractive species. The bark of mature trees is minni-ritchi type, rolling and peeling off in slender ribbons, adding further character to the tree.
It prefers well drained soils and full sun, and is very drought tolerant once established. The leaves may get fungal leaf spot during damp winters or if there is poor air movement around the plant. The trees can be coppiced to ground level to encourage new stems.

Eucalyptus cosmophylla (Cup Gum) - This species from south-east South Australia may grow as a multi-trunked mallee to 5 metres tall, or as a single trunked small tree to 10 metres tall. Between July and November, the large creamy white flowers are formed in tight clumps on the ends of the branches and provide a stunning display, while the native birds squabble over the aromatic nectar. The mallee form is wide spreading and creates a very good screen plant with thick, dense leaves.
It prefers full sun or part shade, will grow in a wide range of soils and tolerates winter wet soils.

Eucalyptus crenulat a(Buxton Gum) - This species is endangered in the wild in central Victoria. With less than 700 plants in its natural habitat, it is small tree growing up to 12 metres tall and has very attractive foliage to near ground level, making it a popular plant suited to home gardens and street sides. In the spring small bunches of white flowers are held amongst the leaves but the honey aroma quickly tells you to expect the native wildlife to visit. The tree may be cut back to the lignotuber, encouraging a flush of attractive silver foliage which is often used in floral arrangments.
The tree grows in full sun or part shade and tolerates a wide range of heavy wet soils but is not drought tolerant.

Eucalyptus crucis (Silver Mallee) - This species has three subspecies, one of which (subsp. crucis) is growing in the Australian Garden. This subspecies grows naturally in limited locations near granite outcrops, inland from Perth in Western Australia and is listed as 'endangered' in the state. It may grow up to 8 metres tall but is generally smaller in cultivation. It has round silver-blue leaves which are closely attached to the stems and provide great contrast to the bark of a mature plant, which is minni-ritchi type, rolling and peeling off in slender ribbons, adding further character to the plant. In late spring the creamy white flowers burst from what look like bunches of small red grapes amongst the leaves.
This plant needs full sun and well drained soil. The leaves may get fungal leaf spot during damp winters or if there is poor air movement around the plant.

Eucalyptus curtissii (Plunkett Mallee) - This multi-trunked mallee, or single trunked small tree from south-east Queensland grows up to 7 metres tall, with smooth silver-grey bark which peels off in long ribbons to ground level. In spring, large clusters of smaller white flowers cover the ends of the branches.
Considered 'near threatened' in the wild, this species will grow in a range of soils and will tolerate winter wet conditions but it prefers full sun. It has a lignotuber and can be coppiced.

Eucalyptus depauperata - Scattered across inland southern Western Australia, this mallee grows from 2 to 4 metres tall. It usually has many bunches of small, bright yellow flowers but in the wild it is not unusual to find plants with rich red flowers. The smooth bark on the trunks is shiny red-brown in colour and is a great feature which attracts attention all year around.
It prefers well drained soils and full sun but is very drought tolerant once established.

Eucalyptus diversifolia (Soap Mallee) - This variable plant ranges in height from 3 to 10 metres tall. Generally it grows as a mallee form tree but in higher rainfall areas of its natural range it may grow as a single trunked small tree. It grows naturally in scattered locations along the south coast of Australia from near Eucla in Western Australia, through South Australia, to the west coast of Victoria. It has three different subsp. diversifolia, hesperia and megacarpa. The latter is restricted to western Victoria and is considered 'vulnerable' in the wild. They have white flowers in late winter or early spring, firm blue-green leaves, and attractive white bark which peels off seasonally. It has a well rounded, dense canopy of foliage.
It prefers full sun and well drained to medium soils, and is very drought tolerant once established.

Eucalyptus erythrocorys (Illyarrie) - This small tree grows naturally around Geraldton in Western Australia where it may grow up to 9 metres tall, but in cultivation it is generally smaller. It is one of the most attractive of all the eucalypts, where the bright red caps contrast with the vivid sulphur-yellow stamens on flowers that may be 7 cm wide. The large woody fruit are sought after for use in floral art.
This plant prefers well drained soils, full sun and may be damaged by frost when they are young. Once established, they are highly drought tolerant. It tolerates seaside conditions.

Eucalyptus erythronema (Red-flowered Mallee) - This mallee tree, which grows up to 7 metres tall, occurs naturally mid-way between Perth and Kalgoorlie. The subsp. inornata has a conservation Level 3 in Western Australia. During spring or early summer, attractive clumps of red flowers hang from the branches while lower down, the white trunk is covered with powder like material.
The plants prefer well drained soils and full sun but once established, they are highly drought tolerant. They can be cut back to the lignotuber to re-invigorate them.

Eucalyptus forrestiana (Fuchsia Gum) - This small tree grows naturally around Esperance in Western Australia where it may grow up to 5 metres tall, but in cultivation it is generally smaller. It is a real eye catching eucalypt throughout the year because of the prolific number of orange to bright red flower buds which contrast with the wispy foliage canopy. In late summer the flowers open with a small bunch of yellow stamens which makes the flower look like a four sided cone of yellow ice-cream.
It enjoys full sun and will grow in a wide range of soils but doesn't like it too wet.

Eucalyptus gregsoniana (Wolgan Snow Gum) - Growing naturally in the southern mountain areas in New South Wales, this mallee form, or occassionally tree form species, grows up to 5 or rarely 7 metres tall. It is considered rare in the wild but is becoming a popular garden plant, even in the United Kingdom. In spring, the new shoots are a rich burgundy colour, then in summer the small white flowers open to attract nectar loving wildlife.
It likes full sun or partial shade, is tolerant of better draining heavier soils and can be coppiced back to the lignotuber to re-invigorate the tree.

Eucalyptus grossa (Coarse-leaved Mallee) - This mallee species grows in scattered locations near granite outcrops, inland from Esperance, in Western Australia. It grows to 3 metres tall, with rough grey bark but may develop a quite beautiful tortuous form. In spring it produces large yellow-green flowers amongst the thick leathery leaves.
It prefers full sun but grows well in a wide range of soils and can be coppiced back to the lignotuber to re-invigorate the tree.

Eucalyptus kitsoniana (Bog Gum) - This mallee tree from the coastal areas of southern Victoria is classified as 'rare' in the wild. It grows in boggy, often heavy soils and is ideal for more difficult growing conditions. This fast growing plant may grow up to 8 metres tall, has a dense foliage canopy and smooth yellow, white or grey bark which peels off in long ribbons. Creamy coloured flowers can occur between spring and autumn.
It likes full sun or partial shade and may be coppiced back to its lignotuber to reinvigorate the plant.

Eucalyptus kruseana (Bookleaf Mallee) - This open mallee species grows in scattered locations near granite outcrops south of Kalgoorlie, in Western Australia, where it is classified as 'rare'. It grows to 3 metres tall, with smooth bark. In late winter or spring it produces whorls of small yellow-green flowers around the small branches and silver-grey gum-nuts which are hidden amongst the beautiful, stem clasping, silver-grey round leaves.
It prefers full sun, tolerates a wide range of soils, is drought tolerant once established, but the plants should be pruned to keep them bushy.

Eucalyptus lacrimans (Weeping Snow Gum) - This small tree from around Adaminaby in alpine New South Wales, is classified as 'rare' due to its very limited natural range and grows to about 10 metres tall. It has smooth white or grey bark on the trunk, which shreds off in narrow ribbons. The upper young branches gracefully weep, holding the small pompoms of white flowers in the summer which attract nectar loving wildlife.
This species will grow in a range of soils and will tolerate winter wet conditions, but it prefers full sun.

Eucalyptus lansdowneana (Crimson Mallee) - In the wild, this species from southern South Australia is quite uncommon, but in the home garden it is very popular. Growing up to 6 metres tall, the upper bark is grey or creamy white and smooth. Numerous red flowers are produced in spring and summer and provide great contrast against the open foliage canopy.
It prefers full sun but grows well in a wide range of soils and can be coppiced back to the lignotuber to re-invigorate the tree.

Eucalyptus latens (Narrow-leaved Red Mallee) - This slender mallee from south-west Western Australia grows up to 4 metres tall. The eye catching smooth white to copper coloured bark highlights the bluish coloured new leaves and shoots. The white flowers are small but very prolific, providing a wonderful display in late summer. It prefers full sun or partial shade but tolerates a range of well drained soils. It is drought tolerant once established. Eucalyptus sp. (Sullivan Soak) which is often sold by nurseries as 'Moon Lagoon' is a very similar species which has not yet been described by taxonomists. Both species can be coppiced back to the lignotuber to encourage masses of grey coloured new shoots and foliage which provide a great display in the garden.

Eucalyptus leptophylla (Narrow-leaved Red Mallee) - This mallee grows naturally in scattered locations from southern Western Australia, across South Australia, in to Victoria and New South Wales. Growing up to 10 metres tall, it has smooth grey coloured bark. The bright red flower buds open up to creamy white flowers which are individually small but are produced in groups forming small pompoms at the base of almost every leaf on the newer shoots, providing an extraordinary mass flower display in the late summer/autumn. It prefers full sun or partial shade but tolerates a range of well drained soils. It is drought tolerant once established. The var. floribunda is classified as Priority 1 for protection in Western Australia due to its very restricted distribution.

Eucalyptus leucoxylon (Yellow Gum) - In the wild this variable, single or multi trunked tree can grow up to 30 metres tall but in cultivation, selections have been made which have resulted in the trees being much smaller. It grows naturally in south east South Australia, Victoria, and south-west New South Wales. The lower bark on the trunk is usually rough and brown but the upper bark is smooth and cream coloured or grey. Many white, cream, pink, or red coloured flowers are produced in autumn or winter and provide great winter feed for nectar loving wildlife. It grows in a wide range of soil types, is tolerant of winter wet soil, and will grow in full sun or partial shade.

There are six subspecies:
- subsp. bellarinensis, with cream coloured flowers is classified as 'endangered' due to habitat loss and hybridising with the other subspecies. It is from the Bellarine Peninsula, Victoria, where it grows on heavy clay soils which are water-logged in winter.
- subsp. connata, with cream coloured flowers is classified as 'vulnerable' due to the scattered but limited population north-west of Melbourne.
- subsp. leucoxylon, the most widespread subspecies, a tree to 25 metres tall with creamy white or pink flowers.
- subsp. megalocarpa, from south-east South Australia and far south-west Victoria. This 15 metre small tree has white, pink, or red flowers, larger red gum-nuts and is very popular in the nursery industry being sold as variety 'Rosea'. Classified as 'endangered' in Victoria and 'rare' in South Australia.
- subsp. pruinosa, from south-east South Australia, western Victoria, and near the Murray River in eastern New South Wales. This 25 metre mallee or tree has white flowers, and waxy flower buds and fruit. Classified as 'vulnerable' in New South Wales.
- subsp. stephaniae, from the desert areas of south-east South Australia and the Wimmera region of Victoria. This 15 metre mallee or small tree has creamy or pink coloured flowers.

They prefer full sun or partial shade but the different subspecies tolerate a very wide range of soils and moisture conditions. They are generally drought tolerant once established.

Eucalyptus leuhmanniana (Yellow Top Mallee Ash) - This mallee is from the central coastal plateau area of New South Wales, where it is classified as 'Rare'. It grows to 6 metres tall, with smooth white bark which peels off in ribbons. There is a form with green foliage and a more attractive form with blue-grey foliage, both with white flowers and both are good screen or windbreak plants. It grows in a wide range of soils and tolerates winter wet soils. It can be coppiced back to the lignotuber.

Eucalyptus lehmannii (Bushy Yate) - This mallee from south-west Western Australia generally grows up to 3 metres tall but may attain 7 metres. It has smooth light pink or grey bark. The flower buds start with clusters of finger-like bud caps which may open throughout the year and the flowers are unusual because they are closely joined to form an attractive dense head of greenish yellow stamens.
It prefers full sun and tolerates a range of soils, including those in coastal areas.

Eucalyptus macrandra (Long-flowered Marlock) - This mallee generally grows up to 3 metres tall but as a tree form may attain 7 metres. It is from south-west Western Australia. It has smooth, mottled green and grey bark. In summer, its profusion of bright yellow flowers brighten up the whole garden. It prefers full sun and tolerates a range of soils including those in coastal areas and saline soils. It can be coppiced back to the lignotuber.

Eucalyptus macrocarpa (Mottlecah) - This mallee from south-west Western Australia may grow up to 5 metres tall but is generally about 3 metres. It has smooth grey or pink coloured bark. The individual flowers are amongst the largest in the genus with the flowers opening to over 10 cm wide with generally bright red stamens contrasting against the large, round, waxy, blue-grey foliage and stems. It grows in a range of well drained soils but must have full sun and good air movement to avoid leaf disfigurement in the damp, humid winter.

This species has been described with two subspecies:
- subsp. elachantha, a smaller pink or red flowered sprawling shrub from north of Perth which also has smaller leaves.
- subsp. macrocarpa, more widespread north and east of Perth, with larger red or rarely creamy white flowers and leaves.

Eucalyptus orbifolia (Round-leaved Mallee) - This mallee from inland Western Australia, South Australia, and the Northern Territory may grow to a maximum of 6 metres but generally is around 3 metres tall in Melbourne. It has beautiful minni-ritchi bark which is reddish brown in colour and peels off and rolls inwards in thin ribbons. The attractive round grey-green leaves provide a beautiful frame to the large cream yellow flowers.
It tolerates a range of well drained soils and requires full sun. It is popular in the home garden because of its small size, good form, and foliage density.

Eucalyptus pauciflora (Snow Gum) - This variable species has distinct subspecies which are found mainly in the high country, from south-east South Australia, through Victoria, Tasmania, New South Wales and into far southern Queensland. There are even natural populations growing between Carrum Downs and Devon Meadows near Cranbourne Gardens, south-east of Melbourne. The bark is smooth with patches which may be white, grey, and even green. The bark sheds off in large patches or strips. In spring and early summer, the profuse number of smallish white flowers, which are in groups of 5 to 13 at the base of the leaves, provide a great display and attract nectar loving wildlife to the garden. The leaves are thick and leathery and on some subspecies their shiny surfaces glisten in the sun, while other subspecies have blue-grey leaves, but, they all have very distinct veins on the surface. They tolerate a broad range of soils including winter wet and enjoy full sun or partial shade. The mallee form plants can generally be coppiced. The different subspecies mainly vary in their leaf size and shape, and their flower size. The most common subsp. pauciflora is generally a single trunked tree, whereas the other subspecies may be a multi-trunked mallee form or a single trunked small tree. Some of the subspecies are classified as 'rare' in Victoria so why note help with conservation and grow the subspecies which is local to your area.

Eucalyptus petiolaris (Eyre Peninsula Blue Gum) - This species grows naturally to 12 metres tall in two woodland locations on the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia where the woodland is classified as 'endangered' under Federal legislation due to the threats of fragmentation because of land clearing, salinity and other environmental impacts. The lower bark on the trunk is usually rough and brown but the upper bark is smooth and cream coloured or grey. Many white, cream, pink, or red coloured flowers are produced in autumn or winter and provide great winter feed for nectar loving wildlife. Generally this species grows true to its parents, so it can be grown more reliably to flower the same as the plant from which seed is collected.
It grows in a wide range of soil types, is tolerant of winter wet soil and prefers full sun.

Eucalyptus pimpiniana (Pimpin Mallee) - This small mallee only grows from 0.5 to 2 metres tall on parts of the Nullarbor Plain in Western Australia and South Australia. It has smooth white or grey bark. The large bunches of flowers may be white or yellow and are highlighted against the green-grey foliage.
It needs full sun but tolerates a range of well drained soils once established. It is also very drought tolerant and frost tolerant once established. It makes a great container specimen.

Eucalyptus pleurocarpa (Tallerack or Silver Marlock) - This mallee from south-west Western Australia has smooth white or grey bark which sheds off in ribbons. It grows up to 4 metres tall. It was once incorrectly sold by some nurseries as Eucalyptus x tetragona but this natural hybrid has greener leaves. The shoots, flower buds, and leaves are covered with a white waxy coating which gives the whole plant a ghostly glow, especially from a distance. In summer, the white flowers which form at the ends of the shoots are not conspicuous against the leaves but the gum nuts enlarge and look like bunches of white grapes on the stems. They are great in floral art.
It needs full sun and good air movement to avoid leaf disfigurement in the damp, humid winter. It tolerates a range of well drained soils and is very drought tolerant once established.

Eucalyptus pluricaulis - This mallee from south-west Western Australia has smooth white or grey bark which sheds off in ribbons, often remaining attached to the trunk at the base. It generally grows to 5 metres tall. In autumn and winter, the small yellow flowers contrast well with the foliage. There are two subspecies; subsp. porphyrea has purplish leaves, whereas subsp. pluricaulis has blue-green leaves.
It prefers full sun or partial shade but grows well in a wide range of soils and can be coppiced back to the lignotuber to re-invigorate the tree.

Eucalyptus preissiana (Bell-fruited Mallee) - This small mallee from southern Western Australia has smooth light brown bark. It grows from 2 to 3 metres tall. In spring, the large bright yellow flowers contrast well with the attractive blue-green foliage. There are two subspecies; subsp. lobata is considered as 'rare or near threatened' in Western Australia which is smaller growing but has larger flower buds and fruit and has distinct bumps on the tops of the gum nuts, whereas the more common subsp. preissiana doesn't have them.
They prefer full sun or partial shade but grow well in a wide range of soils including limestone and can be coppiced back to the lignotuber to re-invigorate the plant.

Eucalyptus pulveruenta (Silver-leaved Mountain Gum) - This multi-trunked mallee, or single trunked small tree from mid New South Wales is classified as 'vulnerable' in the wild. It may grow up to 10 metres tall but generally less, with smooth grey or bronze bark which peels off in long ribbons. In winter or spring, small clusters of small white flowers open at the base of the leaves near the ends of the branches. These flowers and the gum nuts are not readily noticable amongst the round blue-grey leaves. The plant is mainly grown for these very attractive leaves, being very popular in the florist industry. The tree is also grown commercially overseas for the same purpose.
This species will grow in a range of soils and will tolerate winter wet conditions and grows in full sun or partial shade.

Eucalyptus saxatilis (Suggan Buggan Mallee) - This multi-trunked small tree from southern alpine New South Wales and the adjacent alpine area of Victoria is classified as 'endangered' in New South Wales and 'vulnerable' in Victoria. It may grow up to 10 metres tall but generally is much less, with smooth yellow-orange, salmon-pink, to grey bark which peels off in long ribbons. In early spring the small cream coloured flowers contrast against the blue-green foliage.
This species will grow in a range of soils and will tolerate winter wet conditions, and grows in full sun or partial shade. It can be pruned down to the lignotuber to rejuvenate the plant.

Eucalyptus sepulcralis (Weeping Gum) - This slender, weeping mallee from southern Western Australia has smooth silvery bark. It grows from 3 to 8 metres tall. In summer, the large yellow flowers contrast well with the sparse but attractive blue-green foliage. The slender habit makes it ideal to use in a smaller garden or even in a large container.
It prefers full sun or partial shade and requires a sandy soil. It is very drought tolerant once established and can be coppiced back to the lignotuber to re-invigorate the plant.

Eucalyptus spectatrix - This multi-trunked mallee from south coastal New South Wales is classified as 'Rare' in the wild. It may grow up to 4 metres tall with smooth grey or grey-brown bark which peels off in ribbons. In winter or spring, small clusters of small white or cream flowers open amongst the blue-green foliage.
This species will grow in a range of soils and will tolerate winter wet conditions and grows in full sun or partial shade.

Eucalyptus tetraptera (Four-winged Mallee or Square-fruited Mallee) - This small mallee from southern Western Australia has smooth light brown bark and may grow up to 3 metres tall. In late winter, large bright red flower buds become obvious on the plant, contrasting well with the attractive, leathery green foliage. The flower buds then open displaying tousled heads of pink to red stamens. The large, unusual, four sided red gum nuts are often sought after for use in floral art.
It prefers full sun and well drained soils, and can be coppiced back to the lignotuber to re-invigorate the plant.

Eucalyptus torquata (Coral Gum) - This spreading small tree from south of Kalgoorlie in Western Australia has rough iron-bark type bark and generally grows to between 4 and 10 metres tall. In early spring, a profusion of unusually shaped orange flower buds become obvious on the plant, contrasting well with the attractive grey-green foliage, then the flower buds open displaying the large colourful bunches pink-red flowers.
It prefers full sun and well drained soils.

Eucalyptus vesiculosa (Corackerup Moort) - This small mallee form plant from southern Western Australia has smooth grey bark, overlaying rich coppery-red new bark. It grows to 3 metres tall. In autumn, the unusual red flowers are seen scattered amongst the leathery shiny green foliage. This species is considered as 'rare or near threatened' in Western Australia.
It prefers full sun and well drained soils. It does not have a lignotuber therefore should not be coppiced.

Eucalyptus victrix (Coolabah) - This small tree occurs naturally, scattered across the northern half of Western Australia, through the central Northern Territory and in to the far west of Queensland. It has smooth white bark. It is variable in height from 1 to 12 metres tall. In summer the creamy white flowers burst open amongst the grey-green foliage. The flowers may be small but the sweet aroma and bird activity will let you know that it is in full bloom.
It prefers full sun and a range of well drained soils but is very drought tolerant once established. This is one of the famous Coolabah trees of central Australia.


Curator Notes

Map of the Australian Garden showing the locations of these species in the Garden
A free chart of 'What to grow where' with all the above information listed in a table

Fact sheets
Selecting your Eucalypt
How to plant your Eucalypt
How to care for your Eucalypt

Videos
Enjoy our series of videos on YouTube to learn more about Eucalypts!