Arts in the Gardens

Explore the connection between art and nature with these upcoming exhibitions at Melbourne Gardens.

Explore the connection between art and nature with these upcoming exhibitions at Melbourne Gardens.

From amazing art made by creative kids to the complex narratives connecting people and plants, our spring exhibitions at Melbourne Gardens will show how love and respect for nature can be expressed in beautiful, different and insightful ways.

Understory
The fragility and preciousness of nature are explored in this exhibition by Victorian visual artist and RMIT PhD candidate, Cara Johnson. Drawing on the complex and layered narratives that connect people and plants, Cara’s object-based works have unfolded through deliberate material choices and dedicated making processes. Personal experiences of land management provide context as she interrogates the complications of landscape restoration and tree planting, while considering the ongoing effects of land clearing.  
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Threatened Species Children’s Art Exhibition  
Thousands of children have put pencil, ink and oils to paper to create artworks exploring the extinction crisis facing our native flora and fauna for the annual Threatened Species Children’s Art Competition. See Victoria’s finalists on show.
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reFraming Nature
Take in this visually stunning collection of natural history illustrations celebrating nature and science. Created with scientific accuracy and artistic technique, these works explore the beauty of birds, bugs, fungi and amphibians.
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Turbulence, Conflict and the Garden of Remediation
Within the perspective of a century of unrest, this exhibition and associated symposium explore the ways in which gardens and plants have unexpected relationships with times of turbulence. Gardens have offered refuge as places of rehabilitation and healing. The plants growing within have figured as talismans of home, as medicines and, now, as harbingers of conflict-driven climate change. Created by Lyndell Brown, Charles Green, Paul Gough and Jon Cattapan, these works represent the place of gardens within the movements of humans caught in turbulent flows.
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