Science and Conservation

The Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne is a leading plant science organisation focussing on the streams of biodiversity and conservation research, and the provision of a variety of information and identification services for plants and fungi.

Our scientists play a key role in discovering and naming plants (taxonomy) and in elucidating their relationships and evolutionary history (systematics). Our biodiversity research covers ecology and biogeography. The Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology (a division of the Royal Botanic Gardens) specialises in understanding the ecology, restoration and management of biodiversity in urban areas. The National Herbarium of Victoria (MEL), based at the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne, houses an internationally significant collection of dried plant specimens and an extensive botanical library.

Much of this research underpins a range of conservation and biodiversity management initiatives in both natural areas, and in urban and suburban environments, and our herbaria resources provide a valuable resource for scientists nationally and internationally.

Research

Scientific research at RBG Melbourne underpins a range of conservation and sustainability initiatives, such as propagation of native orchids and the Victorian Conservation Seedbank. Our scientists are also at the front line in identifying new weeds. Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne scientists have a key role in discovering and naming plants and fungi (taxonomy) and in elucidating their relationships and evolutionary history (systematics). Our biodiversity research also covers ecology and biogeography.


Staff

Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne has some of the top academics in botany from around the world. Find a staff member here.


Publications

Scientists at Royal Botanic Gardens (RBG) Melbourne publish journal articles and books in the areas of taxonomy, systematics, phylogeny, nomenclature, biogeography, conservation, sustainability, ecology and the history of science, with a focus on the flora and fungi of Victoria and iconic Australian plant groups such as Acacia and Eucalyptus.


Resources

The approximately 1.4 million dried plant and fungi collections housed in the National Herbarium of Victoria are an invaluable resource for scientists, land managers and historians.The Herbarium also houses an extensive botanical library and archive, and a collection of botanical art. Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne also provides a variety of information and identification services for plants and fungi, including on-line checklists of Victorian plants and Australian mosses.